Good service is good sales

I live and die by screen sharing and today I died by it. After upgrading my desktop mac to Yosemite with no issues on Saturday I decided to break my own rule and bring the laptop along as well. I didn’t have any really good reason, I just was sitting around and decided to do it. Bad idea!

Monday rolled around and I headed into my first virtual meeting – a working session for our Salesforce solution -ExAM4Government.com. My screen sharing program of choice (5 years ago) died on startup. This began a series of desperate attempts to Google a solution followed by canceling the rest of the days meetings including a sales call. This is bad. Of course the first thing I learned (for about the 50th time) is never, never, never upgrade both machines at the same time. No matter how convenient the timing is or how cool the new features are…it is just a bad idea.

The second thing I learned happened on the desperate support call I made. While on hold I began looking at other screen sharing software. The options are many now several years after I did my first evaluation. I started thinking…maybe it was time to try something new. However once I got on the phone, the gentleman (we’ll call him Hector) was great. He seemed legitimately interested in my well being and dedicated to finding a solution no matter what.

As the time slipped away Hector stayed with me and seemed to really understand not just their software but my issues. He worked through what seemed like a pretty logical progression of steps before finally moving me up a tier in support, where they began to dissect the logs from my crashes.

The whole time I was worried about the next days meetings. What should I do? I literally had my credit card out and was simply debating between my final screen sharing options when it hit me. I needed to give Hector and Scott (Tier 2 Support) a chance to solve this before just stepping off into another product. These guys were working hard and really cared. I decided to wait it out.

Finally, after another 20 minutes or so they got it solved. Changing a setting here and there and I was back in business. I’ve been a customer of this company’s for at least five years now and I’ll continue on. Maybe I should give the other options a chance. Maybe I should do a real evaluation. I won’t do it though. They won me back as a customer with their support. I have had plenty of bad support experiences, so the good ones really stick out.

If you really want customers for life, support them like you care and stick with them until you close the case.

Thanks as always for reading my blog, I hope you will join the conversation by commenting on this post.

If you liked this post, please consider subscribing to this blog and following me on twitter @jmillsapps. I regularly give talks via webinar and speak at events and other engagements. If you are interested in finding out where to see me next please look at the my events page on this blog. If you would interested in having me speak at your event please contact me at events@joshmillsapps.com.

If you are interested in consulting services please go to MB&A Online to learn more.

Jiu Jitsu for the Office: Don’t think try. Think do.

rhall

One of the things that my Jiu Jitsu instructor Ryan Hall stresses repeatedly in classes is the importance of believing in what you are doing and expecting success. When he goes to execute a technique on someone, he knows it will work and therefore it does.

Beyond the martial arts this idea is alive and well. I took a class on Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales) in college and the instructor said in similar fashion that the key to reading Old English like a pro was selling that you knew what it should sound like. After all nobody else in class had been around long enough to tell you with any authority that you were saying it wrong.

The ideas above are mostly about confidence and how it can profoundly impact the outcomes we achieve from our efforts. You hear all the time that the first person you need to sell on an idea is yourself. I am a big believer in this. If you don’t believe why should anyone else?

Getting others to by into your idea of course starts with having a good idea. But once you get that part right you still need to convince others in most cases to get that idea into practice. This starts with believing in it enough that others can sense your confidence and feel comfortable buying in themselves.

The next time you are heading to a big meeting armed only with a powerpoint and a great idea…take the time to remind yourself of why the idea is great. Make sure you have yourself convinced before you try to convince others. Once you have that firmly in mind speak with confidence. It may not make your idea better, but it will make it a lot more likely to carry the day at the meeting.

*Please do not use the technique above to get your bad ideas approved. Only use these powers for good.

Thanks as always for reading my blog, I hope you will join the conversation by commenting on this post.

If you liked this post, please consider subscribing to this blog and following me on twitter @jmillsapps. I regularly give talks via webinar and speak at events and other engagements. If you are interested in finding out where to see me next please look at the my events page on this blog. If you would interested in having me speak at your event please contact me at events@joshmillsapps.com.

If you are interested in consulting services please go to MB&A Online to learn more.